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Repairing Outside Faucets

The Three Types of Outside Faucets

  1. Warm Climate Hose Bibs. These are your typical hose bib (outside faucet). These are a basic compression type valve used in warm areas.
  2. Frost Free Hose Bibs. These are hose bibs that have a deep valve seat inside the wall to keep the faucet from freezing.
  3. Yard Hydrants. These are large frost vertical frost free hose bibs used in the middle of a yard. These typically have a lever handle

Warm Climate Hose Bibs

  1. A warm climate hose bib is normally easier to replace than to fix.
  2. A leaky stem can be normally repaired by tightening the packing nut which is a small half inch or so nut that seals the stem shaft.
  3. If the hose bib drips out the end, remove the stem by opening the valve and turning the large hex nut close to the body. Replace the rubber on the end of the stem. and reverse the process to reinstall.

Frost Free Hose Bibs

  1. Frost free hose bibs are very similar to other hose bibs except the stem has a long shaft going to a deep seat. They are normally easier to repair than to replace.
  2. A leaky stem can be normally repaired by tightening the packing nut which is a small half inch or so nut that seals the stem shaft.
  3. If the hose bib drips out the end, remove the stem by opening the valve and turning the large hex nut close to the body. Be sure to use a second wrench to steady the valve body. Replace the rubber on the end of the stem. and reverse the process to reinstall.


 

Fixing a Private Well

How a Private Well Works

  • A private well has three components:
  1. An electric pump that pumps the water from the underground source.
  2. A holding tank that has a rubber bladder full of air to give the water its pressure.
  3. A pressure switch that activates the pump when needed.  The pressure switch has a high setting (off) and a low setting (on).

When You Have No Pressure But the Pump Is Working

If you have no pressure or the pressure is exhausted quickly you most likely have a faulty holding tank. If you have a faulty holding tank your pump will short cycle coming on when you draw a small amount of water. The best solution in this case is to replace the holding tank.

The Pump Doesn’t Operate

Your pump won’t operate for one of two reasons. Either the pump is worn out or it is not getting any power.

  1. First check the circuit breaker to be sure it is turned on at the power panel.
  2. Check to see if the pump is receiving power with a voltage tester. While you are testing for power at the pump be sure to turn a faucet on to be sure that the water pressure is low enough for the switch to turn on. If you have power at the pump and it is not operating you probably have a worn out pump.
  3. Check to see if the pressure switch is receiving power. If there is no power before the pressure switch you most likely have a worn out fuse or an open breaker. If there is power before the pressure switch and no power after the pressure switch then the switch is open (off). The switch is designed to be open (off) when the pressure exceeds off/on settings. If the water pressure is low and the switch is open then you most likely have a faulty switch and it needs replacing.


 

Water Pressure Problems

The two types of pressure

  • There are two types of water pressure. Static pressure and flow pressure.
  • Static pressure can be measured with a typical pressure gauge like measuring tire pressure. Static pressure is directly related to the elevation of the source of water in relation to the outlet. Static pressure is fairly constant and should be at 60-80 psi at the house. Static pressure is constant throughout the building and any other local buildings at the same elevation.
  • Flow pressure is exactly what it sounds like. It is the velocity of the water coming out of the outlet. Flow is related to static pressure less any resistance the water encounters. Size and length of pipe reduces flow. Small orifices restrict flow. Blockages from small matter can really restrict flow. Opening many outlets at once can restrict flow. Modern piping is designed to handle many fixtures being used simultaneously without affecting pressure

How water pressure is created

  • Community water districts create water pressure by raising the elevation of the water in a water tower. It gives the water column pressure. The pressure is created by gravity. So water pressure at the outlet i.e. your building is directly related to the elevation of the building and the elevation of the water source.
  • Private wells store water in a holding tank that has a rubber bladder inside filled with air. The bladder gives the water its pressure since  water does not compress well.

What causes low flow pressure

  1. Size and length of pipe restricts flow. Pipes that are undersized during construction or that have grown smaller from corrosion (galvanized steel pipe) restrict flow. These pipes may need to be replaced.
  2. Valves that are partially shut or that have particles clogging them restrict flow.
  3. Improperly set or faulty regulators can cause low pressure.
  4. A broken bladder in a private well’s holding tank will cause low pressure. The holding tank should be replaced . Seefixing a private well

 

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Troubleshooting pressure problems

  1. If only one fixture has low flow it is either that a shutoff valve is turned low or that particles are clogging the valve. Remove the aerator at the end of the spout and clean or replace it. If that doesn’t help, disassemble the stems and flush out the valve. Seefaucet repair for instructions. If that doesn’t help replace the faucet or valve.
  2. If the entire building has low pressure, check the aerators. Also check the regulator, if you have one, it should be tightened to increase pressure. Check the main valve to ensure it is fully open. If a faucet flows quickly and then suddenly slows up, you know that a valve upstream needs to be fully opened.
  3. If you have always had low flow and you have cleaned your aerators, shower heads and valves, chances are that you need a repipe.

 

Fixing low flow problems

  1. Check aerators and shower heads and clean or replace them.
  2. If you find small white particles in your aerators it may be that the diptube in your water heater is disintegrating. For more info on diptube failurego to hot water runs out quickly.
  3. Faucet valves can become clogged and may need to be disassembled and cleaned. Seefaucet repair
  4. Check to be sure all valves are fully open
  5. Replace old galvanized pipes if they have become restrictive from corrosion.

Scalding Shower Solutions

  1. Turn down supply valves to toilet tanks to avoid toilets taking pressure from the shower.
  2. Install a pressure balanced shower valve that automatically compensates for pressure drops in hot or cold water.

Excessive water pressure problems

  • Excessive water pressure can cause pipes to rattle or cause hoses and supply lines to burst.
  • Static pressure should be 60-80 psi
  • Install a regulator at the building supply to reduce pressure
  • Install water hammer arrestors to eliminate water hammer


 

Tub/Shower leak repair

Troubleshooting Leaks

  1. What you want to find out is where is the leak coming from. There are three places a tub leak can come from: the drain or drain connections, the rim or sealed openings, or the valve.
  2. A valve leak will be constant unless it is coming out of the handle. It will cause a lot of damage.Fixing shower valve leaks
  3. You will know if the drain is leaking if you fill the tub or shower pan up to the brim flooding the overflow on tubs. If the leak occurs when the tub is full, the leak is before the stopper. If the leak occurs when the tub is drained, the leak is in the drain system.
  4. Next spray water in all the different places on the tub or shower which may leak such as corners and around spouts and valve handles. These are the most common causes of leaks, the rim of the tub and the tub spout and valve handles not being water tight.

Recaulking

  1. When recaulking a tub or shower it is important to remove all the old caulk and that the surface be absolutely clean.
  2. Use a putty knife or a razor scraper to remove all the old caulk.
  3. Use a Scotchbrite pad and cleanser to clean the surfaces to be caulked.
  4. Be sure the surfaces are clean and dry.
  5. Apply an even bead of caulk. If using a water soluble poly caulk or a latex caulk finish the caulk surface with a wet finger. Wipe excess caulk with a wet sponge or paper towel. If using silicone, use a finger dipped in dishwashing soap to finish the caulk.

Replacing a Tub/Shower Surround

  1. Remove the valve trim and the old surround. Remove any wall board or tile backing.
  2. When the surround is removed is a good time to replace the shower valve if need be.
  3. Install tar roofing paper on the walls starting from the bottom up. You may want to seal the paper to the tub with a roof patch such as Henry’s.
  4. Install new water resistant wall board or tile backing being sure to leave at least a half inch gap on the bottom of the board from the tub.
  5. Reinstall surround as per manufacturer’s instructions or tile with wall tile.
  6. Install valve trim and caulk all corners.

Repairing Drain Leaks

  1. Inspect the drain shoe or spud connection for cracks and replace if necessary.
  2. Be certain the overflow cover is sealed properly
  3. You may have to open a ceiling or wall to get to the drain.
  4. Assemble the new waste and overflow and mount to the tub.
  5. Connect the house drain p-trap to the waste and overflow.
  6. Inspect for leaks

Replacing a Tub

  1. For non-tile surrounds, remove the surround. For tile, only the first two rows need be removed.
  2. Disconnect the drain and remove the tub spout.
  3. Cast Iron tubs may be shattered with a sledge hammer. Steel or other tubs may be cut with a Sawzall or portable grinder for removal.
  4. Clean floor and prepare the wall with a 2×4 nailer to hold up the back side of the tub.
  5. Put new tub in place. Connect the drain.
  6. Install a new surround or tile.


 

Maintaining Good Drains

An ounce of prevention is a pound of cure.

The best thing you can do for your drains is control what goes down them.

  1. Don’t allow anything down the drain besides: tissue, human waste, soap, and water.
  2. Try to keep food from going down kitchen drains.
  3. Tie a nylon stocking to the end of the laundry machine exhaust to trap lint.
  4. Use enzymes in sink drains to naturally dissolve sludge.
  5. Consider using a pressure washer to clean out the sink drain if it is a continual problem.

Repairing Clogged Drains

Troubleshooting Clogs

  1. Take a look at a drawing of a basic building drain system.
  2. First thing to do when clearing drains is to troubleshoot where the clog is located.
  3. All the building drains join together under the building into a building main and head toward the sewer or septic tank.
  4. All fixture drains are supplied with a vent to vent gases and protect the trap.
  5. A clog can occur in one of several places such as: the trap, the vertical riser, the horizontal branch, or the main.
  6. Water always seeks the lowest outlet. So in a main clog or branch clog only the lowest drain will show signs of flooding.
  7. Opening clean out accesses can clearly show which areas of the drain are clogged. I.E. if the kitchen sink is clogged, and you open the kitchen branch clean out and it is clear, you know the clog is between the sink and the clean out.

Toilet Clogs

  1. Toilet clogs can often be cleared with a plunger. Using a proper force cup plunger is recommended. A force cup plunger is made for sealing with the toilet drain and forcing the clog down the drain. Be aggressive with the plunger.
  2. If the plunger doesn’t clear the clog or you have reoccurring clogs, chances are there is an object in the toilet such as a toothbrush or a toy. You can clear objects stuck in the toilet with a closet auger.
  3. Retract the head of the auger all the way to the j tube. Insert the auger in the toilet. As you turn the handle work the auger into the drain. Marco makes an auger with an extra long reach.
  4. Another method of removing objects from toilets is toremove the toilet. Drain the toilet, turn it on its side and inspect the drain from the outlet on the bottom of the toilet. Remove the object and replace the toilet.
  5. If the toilet’s integral trap is completely clear and the toilet is still stopped up, you have a blockage between the toilet and the city sewer in the street.
  6. You will need to use a 5/8″ or 3/4″ sewer auger to clear the building drain or the building sewer.Clearing the building drain/sewer
  7. Sometimes, rarely, a toilet gets internal clogs where the water flushes down around the rim of the bowl. This could happen when particles clog these ports. This maybe from a toilet sanitizer like those blue tank cleaners or bleach blocks. When this happens you may need to replace the toilet.

Shower Clogs

  1. If drain water is rising out of the shower drain when other fixtures are used, then you have a clog in the building drain or building sewer.Clearing the building drain/sewer
  2. Remove the drain cover. Sometimes long hair gets caught on the cover and that’s your problem.
  3. Next try using a vacuum plunger. A vacuum plunger is the suction type.
  4. If that doesn’t clear the shower drain, I’d recommend using a 1/4″ sink auger. Try running the snake down the overflow.
  5. As you turn the auger, work the auger down the drain.
  6. As a last resort, if the drain is draining slowly but not stopped up you can use a drain cleaning chemical.Chemicals are very dangerous and must be used with extreme caution. Wear a face shield and gloves.

Tub Clogs

cross sectional drawing of a trip lever tub drain stopper

  1. Tub clogs are prety much the same as shower clogs except that if you have a mechanical trip lever stopper it may be the problem.
  2. Remove the trip lever an pull the stopper out of the overflow. Inspect for damage or clog material.
  3. When using a plunger on a tub be sure to plug the overflow with a rag or something else so that you can get suction with the plunger.
  4. Next try using a 1/4″ sink auger turning it as you feed it down the drain. Use the overflow for entry.
  5. As a final resort, if the drain is slowly draining and not completely clogged, you can try chemicals.Warning: chemicals are extremely dangerous and volitile. Wear a face mask and gloves.

Cleaning Sink Drains

  1. Most sink clogs can be cleared with a vacuum plunger. When using a plunger, plug the overflow on a bathroom sink and the opposite basin on a double kitchen sink. You should feel suction when pulling on the plunger. If need be, create a water seal for the plunger by adding some water. The use of chemicals is only effective on hair and local soft clogs and rarely clears a kitchen sink. I don’t recommend using chemicals on sink clogs.
  2. On bathroom sinks, remove the pop-up stopper and check for hair. If the stopper doesn’t pull out, remove the lever from the side of the drain just underneath the sink.
  3. If you still have a clogged sink, remove the trap underneath the sink. Use a pail to catch any water that comes out when removing the trap. Dump the j piece in the bucket. Inspect for clogs.
  4. If you still have a clog, and it is a kitchen sink, search for a cleanout plug under the sink or behind the wall, perhaps outside and open it. If it is dry, the clog is prior to the cleanout proceed to step 5. If it is flooded, the clog is downstream of the cleanout, proceed to step 6.
  5. Use a 1/4″ or 3/8″ auger on the drain outlet on the wall. Be sure the auger works its way down the drain at the wall tee instead of up the vent. Be sure to lay down rags or cardboard to minimize the mess.
  6. You may want to put a 20 degree kink in the end of the snake to help it to find its way down the tee in the wall. Be careful that it doesn’t go up the vent.
  7. Run a auger down the cleanout assuming you have one. You will probably need a power auger.

 

Laundry Standpipe/Drain Clogs

Laundry standpipe drains overflow because the drains are either partially clogged or are too small to handle the discharge drainage of a modern laundry washer.

  1. Attempt to clear the drain with a snake. This may require gaining access to the drain through a cleanout nearby or the vent or another fixture. You may have to try to get a small snake through the trap. If the problem persists you may have to clean the drain with a jetter.
  2. You may want to add a laundry sink and drain the laundry washer into that so that it can handle the quick volume of the laundry washer and slowly drain it into the system.

Cleaning the Building Drain/Sewer

  1. The best way to clean the building drain/sewer is through a cleanout opening. There should be a cleanout opening at the upper end of the building drain in the backyard of a house hooked up to city sewer. Another cleanout should be located 2′ from the front of the building at the start of the building sewer. Another cleanout may be located near the property line. Sometimes it is best to install a new cleanout to facilitate drain cleaning. If you can’t locate a cleanout, you may try removing a toilet to access the pipe.
  2. In some cities, the curb is marked with an “S” where it intersects with the building sewer. This may help in locating the pipe.
  3. A 5/8″ or 3/4″ sewer auger is needed to clear the building drain/sewer. Enough cable to reach the center of the street is needed.  Typically this takes a hundred feet of cable. Use leather gloves when operating drain equipment. Most rental yards rent this equipment. Read the operator’s manual before using drain equipment.

Fixing The Sink Yourself

Sink Drain Leaks

  1. For the most part, fixing sink drain leaks requires replacing some or all of the drain pipes under the sink.
  2. Unless the drain pipes are exposed, it is recommended to use plastic drain pieces. When joining tubular plastic pipe be sure the wedge on the nylon washer is facing the hub.
  3. When joining tubular pipe to a steel trap arm it is best to use a metal nut not plastic. Metal on metal, plastic on plastic.
  4. If the sanitary tee in the wall cannot be connected to, replace it with a new one that will work.

Replacing a Strainer or Pop Up Assembly

  1. Remove the old drain piece. Cut it out if you have to.
  2. Use plumber’s putty or silicone on the top drain piece that  touches the sink.
  3. Use pipe dope or teflon on the threads under the sink and install the rubber seal.

Replacing the Sink

  1. If the faucet is mounted on the sink install the faucet on the sink before setting the sink. Also install the drain connection to the sink before installing the sink. Use pipe thread sealant on threaded tailpieces
  2. Shut the water off to the sink and disconnect water and drain pipes.
  3. Steel sinks are held down with clamps on the bottom side. Cast iron sinks are simply caulked or tiled right in. Ceramic sinks that sit on the countertop are also held in place with caulk.
  4. Set the new sink in place. Re connect drain and water lines. Put a bead of caulk around the rim of the sink for countertop self rimming sinks.
  5. Test for leaks.

Fixing The Sink Faucet Yourself

Faucet repair for the do it yourselfer

Single Handled Faucet Repair

Double Handled Faucet Repair

Handle Leaks

Replacing the Faucet

 

 

Single Handled Faucet Repair

  • Single handled faucet repair is unique to the make of the faucet. But, with a little courage and investigation it is rather simple.
  1. Always begin faucet repair by shutting off the water supply to the faucet underneath the sink. Open the faucet to relieve any pressure and to assure the water is off.
  2. Remove the handle. Handles are held in place by a screw typically. If there is a cap on the handle to remove, remove it and a screw should be underneath the cap. Sometimes the screw is behind or underneath the handle.
  3. After removing the handle you can remove the cartridge. The cartridge is the guts of the valve. Cartridges are held in place by screws or a large nut or a retainer pin. On some retainer pin types a sleeve must be removed first.
  4. After removing the cartridge is removed you can inspect for damages. On most faucets the cartridge is all that needs replacement. Some faucets require replacement of rubber parts in the valve body itself. Be sure to replace all rubber parts if any.
  5. When replacing the cartridge it is a good idea to lubricate it with a valve lubricant.

Double Handled Faucet Repair

  1. There are generally two types of two handled faucets: The compression type, and the cam type.
  2. When repairing faucets, always start with turning the water off to the faucet.
  3. Remove the handles. Handles are held on by a screw under a cap, or a set screw on the side or underneath the handle. Very rarely a handle is held on by a screw on ring.
  4. After removing the handles, remove the stem or cartridge. Normally this is done by removing a large nut or turning the entire stem.
  5. Replace the stem or cartridge with a new one or install new rubber pieces on the stem.
  6. On compression valves there is a seat inside the valve body which should be replaced at this time. Seats are easily removed with a seat wrench.
  7. Replace all parts, restore water to the faucet and check for leaks.

Handle Leaks

  1. Handle leaks normally occur when the faucet is operated.
  2. Remove the handle.
  3. On most double handle type faucets there is a packing nut sealing the handle shaft. Tighten the packing nut until the handle no longer leaks. Tightening it too tight will make the handle hard to operate.
  4. Other valves are sealed with rubber parts and they should be replaced.

Replacing the Faucet

  1. Always shut off the water to the faucet when working on it.
  2. Remove the supply lines from the faucet end.
  3. Remove the nuts holding the faucet on underneath the countertop.
  4. Sometimes it is necessary to use a basin wrench to remove these nuts.
  5. Remove the old pop-up drain stopper assembly, If necessary, cut it out with a hacksaw or sawzall.
  6. Install the new faucet and pop up drain per manufacturer’s instructions.
  7. Be sure to use Teflon or thread sealant on threads of screw on tailpieces.
  8. Reconnect the water supplies and check for leaks.

Fixing the Water Heater

Gas Water Heaters in Garages

  1. Water heaters in garages should be up 18″ off the floor in order to prevent fires caused by the pilot light igniting possible flammable gases in the garage.
  2. Remove the water heater and install a platform to place the unit on that is 18″ tall.
  3. Move pipes to accommodate the new height.
  4. Install earthquake braces.
  5. Reinstall the water heater.

Water Does Not Get Hot

  1. The water does not get hot because the water heater is not heating the water
  2. For gas water heaters the pilot may be out, the gas may be turned off, or the regulator is worn out. Regulators may be replaced but in most cases it is better to replace the water heater.
  3. For electric water heaters the circuit breaker may be off, the reset button on the elements may be off, or the elements may be burned out. Elements may be replaced by draining the water heater and replacing the elements, but you may just want to replace the water heater.

Hot Water Runs Out Quickly

  1. Hot water running out quickly could be from one of two problems: thermostat set too low or dip tube corroded out.
  2. Water heaters have a dip tube on one of the connection sides so that water will circulate through the tank.
  3. Remove the connection nipples and check for a tube. Replace if necessary.

Shower Scalds or Freezes

  1. It’s the old problem of shower water getting suddenly hot or cold.
  2. Replacing the shower valve 10with a pressure balanced valve will solve the problem.
  3. Otherwise you must avoid using other fixtures when in the shower.

Hot Water Takes Too Long to Arrive

  1. There are two solutions to getting hot water to the fixture faster: a closer water heater, or a circulation line.
  2. A circulation line circulates the water back to the water heater for constant hot water in the pipes.
  3. Nibco makes a gravity fed circulator that requires no power called Just Right. If that won’t work you will need a pump.
  4. Be sure to insulate circulation lines.

Earthquake Preparedness

  1. Water heaters should be properly braced in case of a seismic event.
  2. Consult the local authority for requirements.
  3. Water heaters should be strapped with a manufactured brace for such purpose.

Water Heater Leaks

  1. Water heaters can leak from different locations. If it is leaking from the relief valve or drain valve they can be replaced.
  2. If the tank itself is leaking you will need to replace the water heater.

Replacing the Water Heater

  1. First you will need to shut off the water, power or gas to the water heater and drain it.
  2. If the drain valve doesn’t work it is clogged with calcium and will need to be removed and cleared with screwdriver.
  3. Disconnect and remove the old water heater.
  4. If the water heater is installed in a garage it will need to be on a platform 18″ above the floor.
  5. The relief line should extend to the floor or outside of the building or into a drain.
  6. Install earthquake braces if required.

Lighting the Pilot

  1. Follow pilot lighting instructions printed on the water heater.
  2. If you have no instructions, you will need to turn the valve to pilot.
  3. Depress the knob or button and light the pilot.
  4. Once the pilot is lit hold the button for a few minutes and then release it.
  5. Turn the knob to on.
  6. If the pilot refuses to remain lit you probably need to replace the thermocouple.


 

Tub/Shower Valve Repair

Replacing a Tub/Shower Valve

  1. You can replace a shower valve two ways. You can access it from the back of the wall or you can access it from the shower side of the wall and cover the hole with a cover plate.
  2. Moen and other companies make special cover plates for replacing shower valves. Cut the hole large enough to fit the valve through, but small enough to cover with the plate.
  3. Cut the old valve out or remove the unions holding it in. Use a Sawzall or mini cutters to cut copper. If you want to save the old galvanized steel pipe, don’t cut it.
  4. Be sure to have a fire extinguisher handy when soldering.
  5. Use copper repair couplings without a stop in them when you can’t get regular couplings on.
  6. Install cover plate and valve trim.

Replacing a Roman Tub Valve

  1. You will need to gain access to the underside of a deck mounted tub valve. Use an access panel or make one to gain access.
  2. Turn off the water to the valve. If the valve doesn’t have shutoffs you may want to install some.
  3. Remove or cut supplies to the valve.
  4. Remove and replace the valve.
  5. Have a fire extinguisher ready when soldering copper joints.
  6. Test for leaks and replace access panel cover.

Repairing a Two/Three Handled Valve

  1. There are generally two types of two/three handled valves: The compression type, and the cam type.
  2. When repairing valves, always start with turning the water off to the valve. In most cases this means shutting off the building supply. Homes that share a common supply are required to have shutoffs at the valve for maintenance. These are screwdriver operated stops hidden behind the cover plate.
  3. Remove the handles. Handles are held on by a screw under a cap, or a set screw on the side or underneath the handle. Very rarely a handle is held on by a screw on ring.
  4. After removing the handles, remove the stem or cartridge. Normally this is done by removing a large nut or turning the entire stem.
  5. Replace the stem or cartridge with a new one or install new rubber pieces on the stem.
  6. On compression valves there is a seat inside the valve body which should be replaced at this time. Seats are easily removed with a seat wrench.
  7. Replace all parts, restore water to the valve and check for leaks.

Repairing a Single Handled Valve

  • Single handled valve repair is unique to the make of the faucet. But, with a little courage and investigation it is rather simple.
  1. Always begin shower valve repair by shutting off the water supply to the valve. This usually means shutting off the building main but when families share a main there should be stops next to the valve behind the cover plate.
  2. Remove the handle. Handles are held in place by a screw typically. If there is a cap on the handle to remove, remove it and a screw should be underneath the cap. Sometimes the screw is behind or underneath the handle.
  3. After removing the handle you can remove the cartridge. The cartridge is the guts of the valve. Cartridges are held in place by screws or a large nut or a retainer pin. On some retainer pin types a sleeve must be removed first.
  4. After removing the cartridge is removed you can inspect for damages. On most faucets the cartridge is all that needs replacement. Some faucets require replacement of rubber parts in the valve body itself. Be sure to replace all rubber parts if any.
  5. When replacing the cartridge it is a good idea to lubricate it with a valve lubricant.


 

Fixing The Disposal Yourself

Disposal Does Not Run

  1. If the disposal is making a humming noise as if it is trying to run then it is jammed by an object. You can free the object by using a hex wrench underneath the disposal to reverse the blades. After you free the blades try running the disposal again.
  2. If the disposal is completely silent when you try to run it, then the reset button is open. Underneath the disposal should be a small red reset button. depress the button. If this doesn’t return power to the disposal check to be sure it is plugged in and that the circuit breaker in the house main panel is on.

Replacing the Disposal

  1. Be sure the switch to the disposal is turned off. Unplug or disconnect the power to the disposal.
  2. Disconnect the drain elbow from the system drain and disposal.
  3. Disposals come in two varieties, the In Sink Erator type and all others.
  4. ISE disposals have a lock ring which must be turned counter clock wise to loosen. The lock ring has three ears to put a screw driver or other devise to help loosen the lock ring and remove the disposal. Most other types have a hose clamp type connection which is easily removed with a nut driver or screw driver
  5. Next the sink spud must be removed. On an ISE remove the three screws, then remove the C ring with a screw driver and it will come apart.

Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for installing the new disposal.